The CMUcam4 is a fully programmable embedded computer vision sensor. The main processor is the Parallax P8X32A (Propeller Chip) connected to an OmniVision 9665 CMOS camera sensor module. For more information please see the wiki.


  • Fully open source and re-programmable using the Propeller Tool
  • Arduino Shield Compatible
    • w/ Supporting Interface Libraries and Demo Applications for the Arduino and BASIC Stamp
  • VGA resolution (640x480) RGB565/YUV655 color sensor
    • Image processing rate of 30 frames per second
    • Raw image dumps over serial or to flash card
      • (640:320:160:80)x(480:240:120:60) image resolution
      • RGB565/YUV655 color space
  • Onboard Image Processing (QQVGA 160x120)
    • Track user defined color blobs in the RGB/YUV color space
    • Mean, median, mode and standard deviation data collection – sampled from a 40x120 resolution
    • Segmented (thresholded) image capture for tracking visualization (over serial or to flash card)
      • 80x60 image resolution
      • Monochrome color space
    • Histogram generation (up to 128 Bins) – sampled from a 40x120 resolution
    • Arbitrary image clipping (windowing)
  • µSD/µSDHC flash card slot with FAT16/32 full file system driver support
    • w/ Directory and File manipulation
  • I/O Interfaces
    • Two-port servo controller (pan and tilt w/ 1us resolution at a 50 Hz refresh rate)
      • Pan and/or Tilt servo channels can be configured as GPIOs
    • Indicator user controllable LED (red) and power LED (green)
    • TTL UART (up to 250,000 baud – 19,200 baud by default)
  • Monochrome baseband analog video output (NTSC/PAL) of 160x120 resolution for tracking visualization (segmented (thresholded) image w/ color centroid and bounding box overlay at 30 FPS)
  • CMUcam4 GUI for viewing images on the PC

Download the feature list in PDF form here


This project was supported through the generosity of Parallax, Lextronic, SparkFun, and the Semiconductor Research Corporation. This project is from The Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and the Undergraduate Research Office at Carnegie Mellon University.

Questions or Comments?

Contact us at .